meet the mysterious, stunning osbourne sister, aimee

    her music, her vibes, her style

    by leila brillson · May 11, 2015

    Photographed by Myles Pettengill / Makeup by Colby Smith

    It would have made tons of sense for Aimee Osbourne to come out as a singer-songwriter back when The Osbourne's were taking over television. Everyone would have paid attention, as the tribulations of Ozzy, Sharon, Jack, and Kelly seemed to have captivated most of TV-watching America. But, that would have been the easy, obvious path. And there is nothing obvious about Aimee Osbourne, and her new musical project ARO. 

     

    <p>Reach back into your knowledge of pop culture (or, even head over to Wikipedia) and you can remember that the eldest daughter of Sharon and Ozzy&nbsp;staunchly refused to participate in her family's reality television show—a move that is pretty punk rock.&nbsp;"I think, you know, when people say, 'Why the choice?' it didn’t even feel&nbsp;like, 'Should I or shouldn’t I?' It was&nbsp;just not my aspiration," she says, of her decision to refrain from the show.&nbsp;</p><p>She has another smart reason for not being on reality television as a teenager: "Everywhere you went people wanted to know everything, and that when you’re growing up that can be kind of intimidating. The idea of kind of letting it all out there at that point, at around fifteen...Nobody at fifteen wants anybody to see how goofy their parents are." That choice now has impact, because when ARO releases music, it will stand—as much as it can, for someone in her position—on its own. "It was like a typical concern combined with kind of an inner knowing that this is absolutely not for me," she says, firmly.&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>

    Photo by Myles Pettengill / Makeup by Colby Smith

    Reach back into your knowledge of pop culture (or, even head over to Wikipedia) and you can remember that the eldest daughter of Sharon and Ozzy staunchly refused to participate in her family's reality television show—a move that is pretty punk rock. "I think, you know, when people say, 'Why the choice?' it didn’t even feel like, 'Should I or shouldn’t I?' It was just not my aspiration," she says, of her decision to refrain from the show. 

    She has another smart reason for not being on reality television as a teenager: "Everywhere you went people wanted to know everything, and that when you’re growing up that can be kind of intimidating. The idea of kind of letting it all out there at that point, at around fifteen...Nobody at fifteen wants anybody to see how goofy their parents are." That choice now has impact, because when ARO releases music, it will stand—as much as it can, for someone in her position—on its own. "It was like a typical concern combined with kind of an inner knowing that this is absolutely not for me," she says, firmly. 

     

    Though ARO only has one song and corresponding video out so far,&nbsp;the album is nearly complete and the visuals that will accompany it seem to be solidly in place. "The rest of the album is still very much kind of cinematic, haunting, and&nbsp;atmospheric feel. Some of the songs are a little heavier; some of the songs are bit more sweet, but still kind of spooky in a way," she describes. The idea of a fully formed album that sounds like a truly connected piece of music&nbsp;appeals to her, so the process has been intense—but very deliberate. "I like to feel like it’s taking me through kind of a journey as opposed to kind of cut up songs from a bunch of different people where it can kind of feel a little bit disconnected."

    Photo by Myles Pettengill / Makeup by Colby Smith

    Though ARO only has one song and corresponding video out so far, the album is nearly complete and the visuals that will accompany it seem to be solidly in place. "The rest of the album is still very much kind of cinematic, haunting, and atmospheric feel. Some of the songs are a little heavier; some of the songs are bit more sweet, but still kind of spooky in a way," she describes. The idea of a fully formed album that sounds like a truly connected piece of music appeals to her, so the process has been intense—but very deliberate. "I like to feel like it’s taking me through kind of a journey as opposed to kind of cut up songs from a bunch of different people where it can kind of feel a little bit disconnected."
    The entire project, from the singular video to the imagery she has been using, has been shrouded in secrecy. Of course, she doesn't want her background to be a part of the narrative, but there is another reason, too. "I think for me I’m always... I find myself to be a very curious person when something interests me and I find that I’m attracted to that mystery.&nbsp;I’m really not someone who is drawn to something that’s in your face, it feels a little forced. But it’s also not something that I’m sitting in my room everyday think how I can be more mysterious, you know what I mean?"

    Photo by Myles Pettengill / Makeup by Colby Smith

    The entire project, from the singular video to the imagery she has been using, has been shrouded in secrecy. Of course, she doesn't want her background to be a part of the narrative, but there is another reason, too. "I think for me I’m always... I find myself to be a very curious person when something interests me and I find that I’m attracted to that mystery. I’m really not someone who is drawn to something that’s in your face, it feels a little forced. But it’s also not something that I’m sitting in my room everyday think how I can be more mysterious, you know what I mean?"
    But her mysterious nature is, of course, a part of the game, as well. "There was definitely a time where I really didn’t want to be in the public eye, or have people know who I was and then they knew what my last name was, and you know, I’ve battled with that a little bit. That’s a little different now, and I think people mistook me being a little bit more introverted for being not super warm and open and friendly, and trying to be bit more mysterious. A lot of the time, it’s just me coming out of my own head, daydreaming about random things."

    Photo by Myles Pettengill / Makeup by Colby Smith

    But her mysterious nature is, of course, a part of the game, as well. "There was definitely a time where I really didn’t want to be in the public eye, or have people know who I was and then they knew what my last name was, and you know, I’ve battled with that a little bit. That’s a little different now, and I think people mistook me being a little bit more introverted for being not super warm and open and friendly, and trying to be bit more mysterious. A lot of the time, it’s just me coming out of my own head, daydreaming about random things."
    With a naturally introverted personality, the process of performing for large groups of people is one that Aimee is still figuring out. But, her live performances are crucial to her vision of the project as a whole.&nbsp;"I’ve learned to kind of accept that [if being nervous before a show is] what’s going on inside of me, to just ignore it a little bit. But once I realized it was kind of an adrenaline situation, which was kind of more of like a chemical, natural thing that I wasn’t really choosing, it got easier."&nbsp;

    Photo by Myles Pettengill / Makeup by Colby Smith

    With a naturally introverted personality, the process of performing for large groups of people is one that Aimee is still figuring out. But, her live performances are crucial to her vision of the project as a whole. "I’ve learned to kind of accept that [if being nervous before a show is] what’s going on inside of me, to just ignore it a little bit. But once I realized it was kind of an adrenaline situation, which was kind of more of like a chemical, natural thing that I wasn’t really choosing, it got easier." 
    Osbourne herself is beautiful and bright, engaging in eye contact through the whole interview and stopping to ask questions, while&nbsp;playing with&nbsp;her incredibly arranged rings and taking moments&nbsp;to pause to really think about her answers. It is clear there is experience with the media here, but she is not wary of it—especially because she is talking so passionately about a project that quite obviously resonates with her. Now, it appears, it is her time: "There was a moment a little while ago where I was like, 'Shit, I wish this would’ve come together five, six years ago,' but then I think about where I was and who I was then and I would have been doing a disservice to myself and to everyone else that was trying to help me at the time. So, I really think everything happens for a reason."

    Photo by Myles Pettengill / Makeup by Colby Smith

    Osbourne herself is beautiful and bright, engaging in eye contact through the whole interview and stopping to ask questions, while playing with her incredibly arranged rings and taking moments to pause to really think about her answers. It is clear there is experience with the media here, but she is not wary of it—especially because she is talking so passionately about a project that quite obviously resonates with her. Now, it appears, it is her time: "There was a moment a little while ago where I was like, 'Shit, I wish this would’ve come together five, six years ago,' but then I think about where I was and who I was then and I would have been doing a disservice to myself and to everyone else that was trying to help me at the time. So, I really think everything happens for a reason."
    Osbourne could have chosen fame at a young age, but she didn't. Instead, she waited until she had a project she could really get behind. It is a testament both to quality and to the fact that Osbourne's decision to debut now is one borne of maturity and true self discovery—instead of chasing that illusive title of "hot young thing." Instead, she is the mysterious, evocative talent who is letting&nbsp;us in, glimpse by glimpse, to her enigmatic world.

    Photo by Myles Pettengill / Makeup by Colby Smith

    Osbourne could have chosen fame at a young age, but she didn't. Instead, she waited until she had a project she could really get behind. It is a testament both to quality and to the fact that Osbourne's decision to debut now is one borne of maturity and true self discovery—instead of chasing that illusive title of "hot young thing." Instead, she is the mysterious, evocative talent who is letting us in, glimpse by glimpse, to her enigmatic world.
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