All 88 Of The Books On The 'Gilmore Girls' Reading List That You Really Need To Read

Rory would approve

Over the course of beloved television series Gilmore Girls, one thing became crystal clear: Rory Gilmore really loves to read. While viewers didn't need to be particularly perceptive to pick up on this personality trait, it did take a certain kind of viewer, one with an obsessive attention to detail, to compile the official Gilmore Girls reading list that's been floating around the internet for the last several years. Specifically, it took Australian writer Patrick Lenton to come up with the 337 books that Rory could be seen with during the series' seven season run. Lenton published the full list on his website, and has been diligently slogging through it as part of the Rory Gilmore Reading List Challenge. (He is now up to 52.)

While we commend Lenton's tenacious and completist approach to said challenge, we think there's another way to do this, a way which doesn't involve reading all 337 books, but which will still make you feel more connected than ever before to all things Gilmore. Because, really, isn't that the point of a Gilmore Girls reading list? To make the intrepid reader feel like they're in Stars Hollow, drinking coffee at Luke's Diner, and listening in on conversations happening at rapid-fire speed? Of course it is. And how are you going to do that if you're spending all your time reading 337 books? Simply put: You won't. Rather, you'll feel overextended and world- (or at least word-) weary, and won't have the energy to even get enthused for the upcoming Gilmore Girls revival. And wouldn't that be a shame?

Rather, before you reimmerse yourself in the world of Stars Hollow, take some time doing what Rory, as per her high school valedictory speech, would do, and spend some time in "a world of books," where you too can feel like you've become "a resident of Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha County, hunted the white whale aboard the Pequod, fought alongside Napoleon, sailed a raft with Huck and Jim, committed absurdities with Ignatius J. Reilly, rode a sad train with Anna Karenina, and strolled down Swann’s Way.”