Lena Dunham Wonderfully Sums Up The Bittersweet End Of 'Girls'

So many tears

Photo courtesy of Instagram / @lenadunham

Although the sixth and final season of Girls won’t end until sometime next year, for the cast and crew it ended last night. Lena Dunham, who created the show when she was 23, got hyper-emotional as it wrapped its final shots, letting her feels flood out on Instagram in a series of posts, some featuring old cast shots of the four leads and others featuring Dunham just straight-up crying.

“I know I'm not alone in the Girls family when I say this is the end of the largest and most potent chapter of my life so far,” Dunham wrote in the first post. “Before Girls I had zero identity, zero self-love and an urgent sense of untapped creative desire that kept me up and sweating at night in other people's beds, wondering why vague sexual affirmation wasn’t enough to make me feel human.”

Prior to Girls, Dunham had created the web series, Delusional Downtown Divas, and had directed the successful indie, Tiny Furniture, but according to her, they weren’t nearly as creatively fulfilling as the process of making Girls. “When we shot our pilot six years ago, I never dreamed that I could be so fulfilled by the process of art-making, of collaboration, of honest expression,” she wrote. “And so through this show I developed an identity, gained a new kind of family and began my life in earnest.”

 

Girls Goodbye (1 of 3) It’s 2 am on Friday morning and we just finished shooting Girls. Forever. No insert shots of cell phones or exteriors to grab. We’re not missing a quick shot of Shosh marching down a Soho street. We’re finished. We did it all. Jenni called that final cut, I dropped my costume on our van floors (sorry Kristen, sorry I never hang my damned costume) and we got into our vans to head home for the last time. To say I don't enjoy goodbyes is an understatement. But, as a wise woman once told me, "relish it. We so rarely get to choose our goodbyes." She's right. And we got to choose this one. But that doesn't mean it's easy-- I know I'm not alone in the Girls family when I say this is the end of the largest and most potent chapter of my life so far. Before Girls I had zero identity, zero self-love and an urgent sense of untapped creative desire that kept me up and sweating at night in other people's beds, wondering why vague sexual affirmation wasn’t enough to make me feel human. I had hardly an inkling of the responsibility we take on when we tell stories, or of the power words can have, but what I had- as an obsessed fan of shows from Girlfriends to Felicity to Ally McBeal- was the audacity to think that people might want to see women like my friends and me (broken, imperfect, angry) on television. When we shot our pilot six years ago, I never dreamed that I could be so fulfilled by the process of art-making, of collaboration, of honest expression. And so through this show I developed an identity, gained a new kind of family and began my life in earnest. It's an embarrassment of riches. There are too many essential personnel to name here, and the messages I have for them are far too intimate for this modern venue, but I trust I've made it clear who you are and what you mean to me. If I haven't, please feel free to demand explanations.

A photo posted by Lena Dunham (@lenadunham) on

Someone who was feeling the end as hard as Dunham was Allison Williams, who stayed on set until the bittersweet end. “Last pic of the night,” Dunham wrote under a picture of her and Williams, teary-eyed. “@aw stayed until the bitter end like the queen she is. This is what 45 minutes of sobbing followed by me forcing a selfie on Allison looks like.”

Williams got equally emotional and retrospective after shooting her final scene as Marnie. “Marnie has officially gone wherever all characters go when we stop watching them. And I couldn't feel luckier that I got to play her,” she wrote in a post. She continued:

This lady, @lenadunham, gave me everything. She gave me the most incredible challenges and adventures and the opportunity to know and love our GIRLS family. She also gave me her fierce friendship, wit, love, and loyalty, all while making me giggle on a constant basis.

 

Marnie has officially gone wherever all characters go when we stop watching them. And I couldn't feel luckier that I got to play her. This lady, @lenadunham, gave me everything. She gave me the most incredible challenges and adventures and the opportunity to know and love our GIRLS family. She also gave me her fierce friendship, wit, love, and loyalty, all while making me giggle on a constant basis. Sitting next to Lena while being directed by @jennikonner, it all felt completely right. Then I immediately burst into some pretty rare tears, because it hit me that I don't know what my adult life looks like without Girls. To everyone - our cast, our crew, HBO, my family - thank you. And to @juddapatow, thanks for watching a YouTube video of a 22 year-old fresh out of college and inviting her to audition for Marnie Marie Michaels. I've been grateful every single day since. #EndOfGirls #ThatsAWrapOnMarnie

A photo posted by Allison Williams (@aw) on


The final season of Girls is slated to premiere this winter.