Download this wallpaper

    8 Of Your Favorite Cult Classics You Can Netflix Right Now

    you know you love 'em.

    by gabriel bell October 20, 2015

    Image via New World Pictures

    You boot up Netflix with the intention to find something new, something exciting, something you’ve never seen before. But, honestly, sometimes all that hunting and finding just isn’t as satisfying as grabbing an old, cult classic you’ve seen 24.6 times and settling in for a long evening of lip-synching along to the dialogue. Really, the oldest and most-time tested pleasures are often the best.

    So, here are eight cult classics that are already in your mental list of all-time faves to add to your queue and have on call for the next time an old bestie is over, or when you just want to curl up and disappear into familiar world for 120 minutes. Enjoy.

    <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><strong><em>Heathers </em>(1988)<br /></strong></span>The fashions. The dark humor. The high-school drama. <em>Heathers </em>is just so close to our hearts we can feel it bumping against our sides. It&rsquo;s particularly good when you&rsquo;re in a foul mood after a day of office politics when you&rsquo;re just about ready to straight-up murder those girls over in accounts payable&mdash;damn them.</p>
<p class="p1"><a href="http://www.netflix.com/title/580335"><span class="s1">Watchlist it!</span></a></p>
<p class="p1">&nbsp;</p>

    Image via New World Pictures

    Heathers (1988)
    The fashions. The dark humor. The high-school drama. Heathers is just so close to our hearts we can feel it bumping against our sides. It’s particularly good when you’re in a foul mood after a day of office politics when you’re just about ready to straight-up murder those girls over in accounts payable—damn them.

    Watchlist it!

     

    <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><strong><em>Pulp Fiction </em>(1994)<br /></strong></span>Are you one of those people whose knowledge of the dialogue here would allow you to perform a one-person show of Tarantino&rsquo;s masterwork? Good. Why don&rsquo;t you just go ahead and do that when you&rsquo;re folding laundry. So therapeutic. &ldquo;Gar&ccedil;on means &lsquo;boy.&rsquo;&rdquo;&nbsp;</p>
<p class="p1"><span class="s1"><a href="http://www.netflix.com/title/880640">Watchlist it!</a></span></p>

    Image via Miramax

    Pulp Fiction (1994)
    Are you one of those people whose knowledge of the dialogue here would allow you to perform a one-person show of Tarantino’s masterwork? Good. Why don’t you just go ahead and do that when you’re folding laundry. So therapeutic. “Garçon means ‘boy.’” 

    Watchlist it!

    <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><strong><em>Clueless </em>(1995)<br /></strong></span>Honestly, if there&rsquo;s a movie out there that boost our mood more than this, we haven&rsquo;t found it. Just sit back and let the driving-test scene wash over you. That, or gaze at Paul Rudd&rsquo;s practically unchanged face and wonder what kind of pact with the devil he has.</p>
<p class="p1"><span class="s1"><a href="http://www.netflix.com/title/384406">Watchlist it!</a></span></p>

    Image via Paramount Pictures

    Clueless (1995)
    Honestly, if there’s a movie out there that boost our mood more than this, we haven’t found it. Just sit back and let the driving-test scene wash over you. That, or gaze at Paul Rudd’s practically unchanged face and wonder what kind of pact with the devil he has.

    Watchlist it!

    <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><strong><em>Labyrinth </em>(1984)<br /></strong></span>In childhood, this was a somewhat dark, somewhat creepy dive into the weirder side of fairytale tropes. Now, it&rsquo;s soothingly charming&mdash;particularly in the Bowie scenes. We <em>still </em>want a Ludo of our very own. Oh, and, &ldquo;You have no power over me.&rdquo; Classic.</p>
<p class="p1"><a href="http://www.netflix.com/title/680020">Watchlist it!</a></p>

    Image via Tri-Star Pictures

    Labyrinth (1984)
    In childhood, this was a somewhat dark, somewhat creepy dive into the weirder side of fairytale tropes. Now, it’s soothingly charming—particularly in the Bowie scenes. We still want a Ludo of our very own. Oh, and, “You have no power over me.” Classic.

    Watchlist it!

    <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><strong><em>Wet Hot American Summer </em>(2001)<br /></strong></span>Naturally, Netflix&rsquo;s sequel series had us going back and revisiting our old friends at Camp Firewood, and&mdash;what do you know&mdash;we actually found some <em>new </em>jokes we missed in our repeated (though admittedly hazed) college viewings. The haze is gone, but Can remains, and we&rsquo;re off to fondle some sweaters.</p>
<p class="p1"><a href="http://www.netflix.com/title/60021299">Watchlist it!</a></p>
<p class="p1">&nbsp;</p>
<p class="p1">&nbsp;</p>

    Image via USA Films

    Wet Hot American Summer (2001)
    Naturally, Netflix’s sequel series had us going back and revisiting our old friends at Camp Firewood, and—what do you know—we actually found some new jokes we missed in our repeated (though admittedly hazed) college viewings. The haze is gone, but Can remains, and we’re off to fondle some sweaters.

    Watchlist it!

     

     

    <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><strong><em>Trainspotting </em>(1996)<br /></strong></span>This, <em>this </em>helped define the music we listened to, the clothes we wore, and the many, many reasons we tended to steer clear of hard drugs. Also, it&rsquo;s the home of the most accurate club scene we&rsquo;ve ever seen. Now you&rsquo;ve got&nbsp;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqvncGxX6AA">this</a> stuck in your head, don&rsquo;t you?</p>
<p class="p1"><a href="http://www.netflix.com/title/60037022">Watchlist it!</a></p>

    Image via Miramax

    Trainspotting (1996)
    This, this helped define the music we listened to, the clothes we wore, and the many, many reasons we tended to steer clear of hard drugs. Also, it’s the home of the most accurate club scene we’ve ever seen. Now you’ve got this stuck in your head, don’t you?

    Watchlist it!

    <p><strong><em>The Addams Family</em> (1991)</strong><br />Our patron saints: <em>Beetlejuice</em>&rsquo;s Lydia Deetz and our old pal, Wednesday Addams. While she&rsquo;s forever our girl (we still sometimes cross our arms over our chests in bed), we&rsquo;re warming more and more to Anjelica Houston&rsquo;s Morticia as we get older. The hair, the nails, the dresses&mdash;it&rsquo;s the mature us.</p>
<p><a href="http://www.netflix.com/title/217258">Watchlist it!</a>&nbsp;</p>

    Image via Paramount Pictures

    The Addams Family (1991)
    Our patron saints: Beetlejuice’s Lydia Deetz and our old pal, Wednesday Addams. While she’s forever our girl (we still sometimes cross our arms over our chests in bed), we’re warming more and more to Anjelica Houston’s Morticia as we get older. The hair, the nails, the dresses—it’s the mature us.

    Watchlist it! 

    <p class="p1"><strong><span class="s1"><em>Mean Girls</em> (2004)<br /></span></strong>Here&rsquo;s another change: As the years go on, we&rsquo;ve stopped seeing this as Cady&rsquo;s journey and stared to see Regina as the main character. Is that weird? You think it&rsquo;s because of LiLo&rsquo;s downward trajectory and the continued solidness of Rachel McAdams? You think it&rsquo;s because Regina&rsquo;s facial expressions were so fetch? Maybe we&rsquo;ve just become mean girls ourselves.</p>
<p class="p1"><a href="http://www.netflix.com/title/60034551">Watchlist it!</a></p>

    Image via Paramount Pictures

    Mean Girls (2004)
    Here’s another change: As the years go on, we’ve stopped seeing this as Cady’s journey and stared to see Regina as the main character. Is that weird? You think it’s because of LiLo’s downward trajectory and the continued solidness of Rachel McAdams? You think it’s because Regina’s facial expressions were so fetch? Maybe we’ve just become mean girls ourselves.

    Watchlist it!

    Tags: film, radar
    Stories We Love