Nite Jewel Chooses Her Ten Most Influential Albums

On the record with the fiercely independent synth-pop artist

Photo courtesy of Nite Jewel

It's been four years since Ramona Gonzalez made waves with One Second of Love, her sophomore album as the synth-pop performer Nite Jewel. The record, released on Secretly Canadian, was her official induction into the music industry after releasing her debut album on her own label, Gloriette. But even back then, she seemed skeptical of the machinery behind selling records through a label, and was way more invested in, you know, making music.

Now, Gonzalez is back with Liquid Cool, a self-produced album, that, according to her, "explores the theme of aloneness in a crowded and disconnected world" and that she literally recorded inside a closet. "I put all my gear—including my eight-track—in a walk-in closet," she says. "I had left my label and was back in my element. I felt like I had found my identity again." Gonzalez did, in fact, leave Secretly Canadian and returned to her roots of fiercely independent music-making. Liquid Cool, out today, will once again be released on Gloriette, and its first single, "Boo Hoo," is a showcase for the kind of artful, '80s-influenced electro-pop that she's mastered.

Here, Gonzalez, a devoted music buff, runs through the records that have influenced her the most.