This Is Where Women In The Industry Find Music

    bad apple

    by Sydney Gore · November 25, 2015

    illustration by liz riccardi

    I'm a girl, I listen to music, and I know where to find it. Apparently, Jimmy Iovine doesn't think so though. Last week, the head of Apple Music appeared on CBS This Morning with Mary J. Blige to promote the campaign for the streaming service. Similar to the previous commercial directed by Ava DuVernay, the new ad features Blige, Kerry Washington, and Taraji P. Henson. When the first ad debuted, the Internet praised Apple for positively portraying female friendship in relation to music consumption. As expected, Iovine opened the conversation by explaining how the streaming service works, but he immediately steered off course with this sexist remark: "So I always knew that women find it very difficult at times—some women—to find music."

    I couldn't believe what I was hearing, but it obviously wasn't a mistake because Iovine proceeded to mansplain when asked about the creative concept behind the commercial. “I just thought of a problem: Girls are sitting around talking about boys, right? Or complaining about boys," he said. "When they’re heartbroken or whatever, they need music for that, right? It’s hard to find the right music. Not everyone has, you know, the right list or knows a DJ.” While Iovine has his credentials—this is the man who founded Interscope Records, co-founded Beats with Dr. Dre and produced albums for a number of successful artists—it's clear that he might not be much different from the other mysogynists that occupy the music industry. 

    Literally everyone has a harder time finding new music these days because of the Internet—while music is more accessible, having all of these streaming services at our fingertips has caused the pool to expand wider than we can reach. Long before Apple Music existed, people have used a variety of sites like SiriusXMNPRPandoraLast.fm and 8tracks to name a few. As a product of the digital age, I grew up trying to watch MTV without getting caught by my mom and regularly record shopping with my dad. Eventually, I switched over to following music blogs before testing the college radio station track. (Shout outs to WVAU and Pigeons & Planes.) Now, I also explore on SoundCloud and Spotify, where I curate customized playlists.

    But for anyone that has ever wanted to really know where girls find music, look no further! I asked 16 badass women with different gigs tied to the music industry about the sources of their music discovery and how they started working in this field in the first place. Click through to read their responses in the gallery, above!

    <div><strong><a href="http://www.thefader.com/" target="_blank">Naomi Zeichner, Editor-In-Chief of The FADER</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/nomizeichner" target="_blank">@nomizeichner</a></strong></div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div><strong>Where/how do&nbsp;you<em>&nbsp;</em>find new music?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I&rsquo;ve searched for songs to love my whole life, in a million ways. As a kid, I binged videos on MTV and The Box, burned CDs from Napster, and talked about old records at a local store that&rsquo;s miraculously still in business. In high school, I was super into making tapes; putting together really meticulous playlists from stuff I&rsquo;d heard on the radio, CDs I&rsquo;d bought, and live shows I&rsquo;d recorded. In college, I DJed an all-vinyl radio show, which I bought way too many records for.</div>
<div>Now, I press play on whatever people are talking about on Twitter. I listen to things my co-workers are excited about, songs that are trending on Audiomack and Shazam, and links that come through my inbox. I follow my friends&rsquo; Soundcloud playlists, listen to the radio in my car, and hang out on YouTube. I like streaming platforms to catch up on new albums, but I&rsquo;ve never been a &lsquo;lean back&rsquo; listener, and I still don&rsquo;t enjoy that experience. My taste is weird. Even though I&rsquo;m getting older, I still know what I like better, and faster, than any algorithm.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I&rsquo;ve always enjoyed talking to people about music. I&rsquo;m still doing it because I still like it! Today, my job is about finding new music, but also just about producing something that's great for anyone to read. I love figuring out how to tell complicated stories, thinking about how to design them, and weaving them together into something that feels like it has its own identity and culture. Most of all, I feel lucky to work with smart people who inspire me. &nbsp;</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I&rsquo;ve had male interview subjects ask me inappropriate things&mdash;like how old I am, or if I have a boyfriend. In most cases, they were doing this while chickening out of answering tough questions.</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>I&rsquo;m confident that Jimmy Iovine knows women are vital music consumers, and critical to the success of Apple Music.&nbsp;</div>

    Photo via @nomizeichner

     
    Where/how do you find new music? 
    I’ve searched for songs to love my whole life, in a million ways. As a kid, I binged videos on MTV and The Box, burned CDs from Napster, and talked about old records at a local store that’s miraculously still in business. In high school, I was super into making tapes; putting together really meticulous playlists from stuff I’d heard on the radio, CDs I’d bought, and live shows I’d recorded. In college, I DJed an all-vinyl radio show, which I bought way too many records for.
    Now, I press play on whatever people are talking about on Twitter. I listen to things my co-workers are excited about, songs that are trending on Audiomack and Shazam, and links that come through my inbox. I follow my friends’ Soundcloud playlists, listen to the radio in my car, and hang out on YouTube. I like streaming platforms to catch up on new albums, but I’ve never been a ‘lean back’ listener, and I still don’t enjoy that experience. My taste is weird. Even though I’m getting older, I still know what I like better, and faster, than any algorithm.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I’ve always enjoyed talking to people about music. I’m still doing it because I still like it! Today, my job is about finding new music, but also just about producing something that's great for anyone to read. I love figuring out how to tell complicated stories, thinking about how to design them, and weaving them together into something that feels like it has its own identity and culture. Most of all, I feel lucky to work with smart people who inspire me.  
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry? 
    I’ve had male interview subjects ask me inappropriate things—like how old I am, or if I have a boyfriend. In most cases, they were doing this while chickening out of answering tough questions.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    I’m confident that Jimmy Iovine knows women are vital music consumers, and critical to the success of Apple Music. 
    <p><strong><a href="http://jezebel.com/" target="_blank">Julianne Escobedo Shepherd, Culture Editor of Jezebel</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/jawnita" target="_blank">@jawnita</a></strong></p>
<div><strong>Where/how do you find new music?</strong></div>
<div>I find new music mostly from a huge feed of blogs both known and deep-web that I've been compiling since about 2007, as well as going through my Soundcloud feeds and looking at charts big and small from around the world. I also read websites like FACT and Resident Advisor and Miss Info and listen to online radio, mostly Rinse FM and NTS. Also, Twitter, and also my friends who are writers, producers, DJs, singers, songwriters, etc. To a much lesser extent, publicists.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Writing and music are the two most important things to me. I'm still here because that's never wavered.</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?</strong></div>
<div>I have so many, but one recent example is being on a panel with slightly older male peers, and being characterized as being unserious in front of hundreds of our colleagues, before I ever got a chance to open my mouth. (One of those men called to apologize later, though; progress!)</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>I would ask Jimmy Iovine why Beats headphones are so expensive when the audio quality loss rate is so shitty. :)</div>

    Photo via Seagull Hair

    Julianne Escobedo Shepherd, Culture Editor of Jezebel@jawnita

    Where/how do you find new music?
    I find new music mostly from a huge feed of blogs both known and deep-web that I've been compiling since about 2007, as well as going through my Soundcloud feeds and looking at charts big and small from around the world. I also read websites like FACT and Resident Advisor and Miss Info and listen to online radio, mostly Rinse FM and NTS. Also, Twitter, and also my friends who are writers, producers, DJs, singers, songwriters, etc. To a much lesser extent, publicists.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    Writing and music are the two most important things to me. I'm still here because that's never wavered.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?
    I have so many, but one recent example is being on a panel with slightly older male peers, and being characterized as being unserious in front of hundreds of our colleagues, before I ever got a chance to open my mouth. (One of those men called to apologize later, though; progress!)
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    I would ask Jimmy Iovine why Beats headphones are so expensive when the audio quality loss rate is so shitty. :)
    <p><strong><a href="http://www.complex.com/" target="_blank">Lauren Nostro, Managing Editor of Complex Music</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/laurennostro" target="_blank">@laurennostro</a></strong></p>
<div><strong>Where/how do you find new music?</strong></div>
<div>Pigeons &amp; Planes, Meaghan Garvey and on Soundcloud, duh.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I honestly fell into it but I'm still here because I love what I do and I love telling artist's stories. That's not to say it's not easy, I put up a fight about something everyday, I'm constantly talked to about my tone and I'm constantly disrespected by some artists, some publicists, and some music industry execs. To quote Nicki Minaj, you have to be a beast to work in the music industry as a female.</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?</strong></div>
<div>One of the more recent ones was the worst. I had a major publicist pitch me an artist for meet and greet. I don't do meet and greets with artists I've never covered because I simply don't have time. I told the publicist this&mdash;three times. He made a joke about how he really just wanted to come in himself and "see my beautiful face." I clapped back and he told me to learn how to take a joke and to smile. I forwarded to my editor in chief and said I'm never dealing with this major publicist again, and if you can kindly contact his boss&mdash;who my editor is close with&mdash;I'd appreciate it. I don't put up with that shit.&nbsp;</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>You should never speak on behalf of Apple Music or about women in a public forum for quite some time. Or, at least, until you ditch the blue tinted glasses.&nbsp;</div>

    Photo via @laurennostro_

    Lauren Nostro, Managing Editor of Complex Music@laurennostro

    Where/how do you find new music?
    Pigeons & Planes, Meaghan Garvey and on Soundcloud, duh.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I honestly fell into it but I'm still here because I love what I do and I love telling artist's stories. That's not to say it's not easy, I put up a fight about something everyday, I'm constantly talked to about my tone and I'm constantly disrespected by some artists, some publicists, and some music industry execs. To quote Nicki Minaj, you have to be a beast to work in the music industry as a female.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?
    One of the more recent ones was the worst. I had a major publicist pitch me an artist for meet and greet. I don't do meet and greets with artists I've never covered because I simply don't have time. I told the publicist this—three times. He made a joke about how he really just wanted to come in himself and "see my beautiful face." I clapped back and he told me to learn how to take a joke and to smile. I forwarded to my editor in chief and said I'm never dealing with this major publicist again, and if you can kindly contact his boss—who my editor is close with—I'd appreciate it. I don't put up with that shit. 
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    You should never speak on behalf of Apple Music or about women in a public forum for quite some time. Or, at least, until you ditch the blue tinted glasses. 
    <div><strong><a href="http://www.mtv.com/" target="_blank">Tannis Spencer, Production Coordinator at MTV</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/_itsMICOLE" target="_blank">@_itsMICOLE</a></strong></div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div><strong>Where/how do&nbsp;you<em>&nbsp;</em>find new music?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I hear about most of my music through either word of mouth or online. I use Spotify and Soundcloud regularly for my music consumption and exploration. Twitter is a great place to hear about songs almost immediately so I'm always pretty up to date on what's going on.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Music and entertainment have always been interests of mine so the transition to working in the industry full time after college was a no-brainer. I've always been that friend in the group that was up on new artists and music before most so it was natural that I made my way into the industry. What keeps me here is knowing that I'm helping bring music and entertainment to the masses like I've always wanted to.&nbsp;</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;</div>
<div>I actually haven't experienced very much sexism first-hand within the industry, so I'm fortunate in that regard. In my professional experiences, race has played more of a factor. It's as though before they even care that I'm a female they're going to recognize that I'm African-American first and draw whatever conclusions they want from that. My gender comes second to my race in a lot of ways.</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>I would just suggest choosing your words better. We like your service, don't over-articulate yourself.</div>

    Photo via @_itsmicole

     
    Where/how do you find new music? 
    I hear about most of my music through either word of mouth or online. I use Spotify and Soundcloud regularly for my music consumption and exploration. Twitter is a great place to hear about songs almost immediately so I'm always pretty up to date on what's going on.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    Music and entertainment have always been interests of mine so the transition to working in the industry full time after college was a no-brainer. I've always been that friend in the group that was up on new artists and music before most so it was natural that I made my way into the industry. What keeps me here is knowing that I'm helping bring music and entertainment to the masses like I've always wanted to. 
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?  
    I actually haven't experienced very much sexism first-hand within the industry, so I'm fortunate in that regard. In my professional experiences, race has played more of a factor. It's as though before they even care that I'm a female they're going to recognize that I'm African-American first and draw whatever conclusions they want from that. My gender comes second to my race in a lot of ways.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    I would just suggest choosing your words better. We like your service, don't over-articulate yourself.
    <p><strong><a href="https://www.facebook.com/prrfectpssy/" target="_blank">Meredith Graves, Musician in Perfect Pussy,</a>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.honor.press/" target="_blank">Founder of&nbsp;Honor Press</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/gravesmeredith" target="_blank">@gravesmeredith</a></strong></p>
<div><strong>Where/how do you find new music?</strong></div>
<div>I work at both Captured Tracks-affiliated record stores in Brooklyn, so when I'm there, I'm surrounded by new and old records. As a touring musician, I often find out about new bands through playing with them. I listen to a lot of podcasts and follow a lot of music sites like Aquarium Drunkard and Las Cruxes' <a href="http://ceasetoexistradio.org/" target="_blank">Cease To Exist</a>. I take recommendations from friends.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I've been in bands since I was 14 but I never aspired to work in music&mdash;I kind of got plucked up like a stuffed animal in a crane machine. Now that I'm here, though, I'm staying, mostly because I want to help ad advocate for people who are victims of its overall sexist grossness.</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?</strong></div>
<div>Yesterday, I was asked to do an interview for a MAJOR comedy/media site that would involve me reading hateful things male journalists have said about me on camera, and then 'either respond or just stand there.' This is unpaid work, to stand there and read terrible things men have said about me, and then... just stand there? The fact that this comedy website knows people will find that 'clickable' and entertaining, that's sexism.</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>You are very old and largely obsolete and will soon be replaced by teenage girls, and the world will be a better place for that.</div>
<p>&nbsp;</p>

    Photo via @gravesmeredith

    Meredith Graves, Musician in Perfect Pussy, Founder of Honor Press@gravesmeredith

    Where/how do you find new music?
    I work at both Captured Tracks-affiliated record stores in Brooklyn, so when I'm there, I'm surrounded by new and old records. As a touring musician, I often find out about new bands through playing with them. I listen to a lot of podcasts and follow a lot of music sites like Aquarium Drunkard and Las Cruxes' Cease To Exist. I take recommendations from friends.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I've been in bands since I was 14 but I never aspired to work in music—I kind of got plucked up like a stuffed animal in a crane machine. Now that I'm here, though, I'm staying, mostly because I want to help ad advocate for people who are victims of its overall sexist grossness.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?
    Yesterday, I was asked to do an interview for a MAJOR comedy/media site that would involve me reading hateful things male journalists have said about me on camera, and then 'either respond or just stand there.' This is unpaid work, to stand there and read terrible things men have said about me, and then... just stand there? The fact that this comedy website knows people will find that 'clickable' and entertaining, that's sexism.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    You are very old and largely obsolete and will soon be replaced by teenage girls, and the world will be a better place for that.

     

    <p><strong><a href="http://www.billboard.com/" target="_blank">Emily White, Associate Charts Director, Social/Streaming at Billboard</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/emwhitenoise" target="_blank">@emwhitenoise</a></strong></p>
<div><strong>Where/how do you find new music?</strong></div>
<div>My favorite way to discover new music these days is live. I&rsquo;m lucky to live in Brooklyn where I can walk to see great live music any day of the week.&nbsp; I always try to see the opening acts when I go to a show even when I&rsquo;ve never heard of them before. It can be a mixed bag, but I&rsquo;ve discovered a lot of favorite bands by randomly seeing them live. Last weekend I saw an awesome band that was new to me called Turf Durt as the first opener on a three bill set. They rocked.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I work in the music industry because I love studying how music creation and consumption evolve and I&rsquo;m still here because I hope to find ways to use that knowledge to help foster an industry where music is accessible and sharable and creators are respected and compensated for their work. &nbsp;</div>
<div>Also: I love music! I&rsquo;m an introvert and music has always been my preferred method of communication.</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?</strong></div>
<div>I&nbsp;experience sexism in the industry in some way nearly every day. It is so pervasive, and often subtle, that I find myself justifying behavior or questioning myself, like &ldquo;<em>Is this really truly happening to me right now?&rdquo;&nbsp;</em>One time at an industry conference, a man I&rsquo;ve never met before interrupted my conversation with another woman. I reached out to introduce myself and shake his hand, and he just looked at me and said, &ldquo;I know who you are.&rdquo; He proceeded to explain to the other woman an article I had written. After he finished telling my own story&mdash;incorrectly&mdash;he turned to me and asked, &ldquo;Aren&rsquo;t you an intern at Billboard now?&rdquo; I&rsquo;d been a full-time employee at Billboard for two years.</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>I&rsquo;d be happy to make you a mixtape anytime.</div>

    Photo by Eric Hian-Cheong

    Emily White, Associate Charts Director, Social/Streaming at Billboard@emwhitenoise

    Where/how do you find new music?
    My favorite way to discover new music these days is live. I’m lucky to live in Brooklyn where I can walk to see great live music any day of the week.  I always try to see the opening acts when I go to a show even when I’ve never heard of them before. It can be a mixed bag, but I’ve discovered a lot of favorite bands by randomly seeing them live. Last weekend I saw an awesome band that was new to me called Turf Durt as the first opener on a three bill set. They rocked.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I work in the music industry because I love studying how music creation and consumption evolve and I’m still here because I hope to find ways to use that knowledge to help foster an industry where music is accessible and sharable and creators are respected and compensated for their work.  
    Also: I love music! I’m an introvert and music has always been my preferred method of communication.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?
    I experience sexism in the industry in some way nearly every day. It is so pervasive, and often subtle, that I find myself justifying behavior or questioning myself, like “Is this really truly happening to me right now?” One time at an industry conference, a man I’ve never met before interrupted my conversation with another woman. I reached out to introduce myself and shake his hand, and he just looked at me and said, “I know who you are.” He proceeded to explain to the other woman an article I had written. After he finished telling my own story—incorrectly—he turned to me and asked, “Aren’t you an intern at Billboard now?” I’d been a full-time employee at Billboard for two years.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    I’d be happy to make you a mixtape anytime.
    <div><strong><a href="http://www.rollingstone.com/" target="_blank">Brittany Spanos, Staff Writer at Rolling Stone</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/ohheybrittany" target="_blank">@ohheybrittany</a></strong></div>
<div><a href="http://www.rollingstone.com/" target="_blank">&nbsp;</a></div>
<div><strong>Where/how do&nbsp;you<em>&nbsp;</em>find new music?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>&nbsp;I devour as much new music as humanly possible each week and typically find music through multiple channels. My friends are my main source, and I closely follow what they're posting on Twitter. I also have the perk of being a professional writer, so I get music dropped into my inbox a lot. I pay close attention to the music my favorite artists are listening to and who they co-sign. I'm also big on music discovery and recommendation services, so what's trending on iTunes or Spotify are things I take note of.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I've always wanted to be a writer and when I started reading magazines like&nbsp;<em>Rolling Stone&nbsp;</em>and&nbsp;<em>SPIN&nbsp;</em>as a teenager, I found that writing about music was a perfect fit for my interests and skills. I'm still pretty young so I'm not as bitter about the industry, so that's why I'm still here. I love writing about music and feel very fortunate for the outlets I've had to express myself with over the past 3 years I've been writing.</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Again, I've been mostly lucky as not only a woman but a woman of color in the industry. I haven't found myself faced with too many micro or macroagressions but I have found that when I tell people what magazine I work at and my position as a full-time staff writer, they don't believe me. I've had many writers and non-writers make assumptions about me; if I lead with&nbsp;<em>Rolling Stone</em>, they assume I'm an intern. I believe ageism also plays a big role and sometimes I can't tell which factor within that combination of being young, black and female makes people assume that I lack substance or authority.&nbsp;</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>I would tell him to pay attention. Spaces for people that ignorant aren't going to exist for much longer.</div>
    Where/how do you find new music? 
     I devour as much new music as humanly possible each week and typically find music through multiple channels. My friends are my main source, and I closely follow what they're posting on Twitter. I also have the perk of being a professional writer, so I get music dropped into my inbox a lot. I pay close attention to the music my favorite artists are listening to and who they co-sign. I'm also big on music discovery and recommendation services, so what's trending on iTunes or Spotify are things I take note of.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I've always wanted to be a writer and when I started reading magazines like Rolling Stone and SPIN as a teenager, I found that writing about music was a perfect fit for my interests and skills. I'm still pretty young so I'm not as bitter about the industry, so that's why I'm still here. I love writing about music and feel very fortunate for the outlets I've had to express myself with over the past 3 years I've been writing.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry? 
    Again, I've been mostly lucky as not only a woman but a woman of color in the industry. I haven't found myself faced with too many micro or macroagressions but I have found that when I tell people what magazine I work at and my position as a full-time staff writer, they don't believe me. I've had many writers and non-writers make assumptions about me; if I lead with Rolling Stone, they assume I'm an intern. I believe ageism also plays a big role and sometimes I can't tell which factor within that combination of being young, black and female makes people assume that I lack substance or authority. 
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    I would tell him to pay attention. Spaces for people that ignorant aren't going to exist for much longer.
    <p><strong><a href="http://www.bkmag.com/">Caitlin White, Music Editor of Brooklyn Magazine</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/harmonicait" target="_blank">@harmonicait</a></strong></p>
<div><strong>Where/how do you find new music?</strong></div>
<div>Of course, at this point publicists send me new music, but I am constantly on the hunt for new stuff. I find new music on Soundcloud, through opening bands at live shows, from friends who live in other parts of the country, by reading smaller blogs and combing through Twitter voraciously and constantly. There are plenty of musicians in my social circle (I tend to avoid DJs however, because on the whole they tend to be assholes), who point me toward artists they've worked with or toured with. I share ideas and recommendations with other journalists and writers, specifically other women. When I was younger, I would find artists I loved through soundtracks and commercials, movies and TV shows, seeking out the rest of an artist's discography from hearing a promotional track. But this is always something I did&mdash;if i heard a snippet of a song or saw an artist pop up somewhere, I'd go home and make an effort to learn more. No matter how I discovered the music, what pleased me more was taking ownership of it, educating myself. I still do that to this day. &nbsp;</div>
<div><strong style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.6;">What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Music was always the only thing that saved me. Whatever I was facing, whatever felt too big or awful to get through, music would help me soldier through. When I moved to New York several years ago and realized writing about music was an actual career path, I became determined to do that. I buckled down and interned, wrote for free, put my name out there constantly until people began read what I was saying and listen to me. I'm still here because every time I've tried to leave, it pulls me back in somehow. I definitely have a love-hate relationship with the industry, but at this point I am hopeful that I can help change it for the better. Particularly by proving to other, younger girls that there&nbsp;is&nbsp;space for them here, there's a lane for them. &nbsp;</div>
<div><strong style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.6;">Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?</strong></div>
<div>When I was hired at one of my first jobs in the industry, the writers who I was supposed to help manage would consistently ignore my emails or instruction, and treated me like I had no authority over them. This was such a mindfuck! Sometimes it's not super blatant, more insidious. Like when you pitch ideas and your male editors talk them down or say they're not necessary, even though you know they're strong pieces and necessary. My experience is more about having my confidence shaken, or my authority as an expert or a voice worth listening to questioned. I've also struggled with being the only one who will point out that something is sexist, or asking to write a rebuttal to a sexist news story like this Jimmy Iovine one and meeting resistance. Insidious sexism is still sexism. If it makes you question yourself and your perspective based on the fact that you're a woman, that's sexism! &nbsp;</div>
<div><strong style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.6;">If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>Hire women.&nbsp;</div>

    Photo via @harmonicait

    Caitlin White, Music Editor of Brooklyn Magazine@harmonicait

    Where/how do you find new music?
    Of course, at this point publicists send me new music, but I am constantly on the hunt for new stuff. I find new music on Soundcloud, through opening bands at live shows, from friends who live in other parts of the country, by reading smaller blogs and combing through Twitter voraciously and constantly. There are plenty of musicians in my social circle (I tend to avoid DJs however, because on the whole they tend to be assholes), who point me toward artists they've worked with or toured with. I share ideas and recommendations with other journalists and writers, specifically other women. When I was younger, I would find artists I loved through soundtracks and commercials, movies and TV shows, seeking out the rest of an artist's discography from hearing a promotional track. But this is always something I did—if i heard a snippet of a song or saw an artist pop up somewhere, I'd go home and make an effort to learn more. No matter how I discovered the music, what pleased me more was taking ownership of it, educating myself. I still do that to this day.  
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    Music was always the only thing that saved me. Whatever I was facing, whatever felt too big or awful to get through, music would help me soldier through. When I moved to New York several years ago and realized writing about music was an actual career path, I became determined to do that. I buckled down and interned, wrote for free, put my name out there constantly until people began read what I was saying and listen to me. I'm still here because every time I've tried to leave, it pulls me back in somehow. I definitely have a love-hate relationship with the industry, but at this point I am hopeful that I can help change it for the better. Particularly by proving to other, younger girls that there is space for them here, there's a lane for them.  
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?
    When I was hired at one of my first jobs in the industry, the writers who I was supposed to help manage would consistently ignore my emails or instruction, and treated me like I had no authority over them. This was such a mindfuck! Sometimes it's not super blatant, more insidious. Like when you pitch ideas and your male editors talk them down or say they're not necessary, even though you know they're strong pieces and necessary. My experience is more about having my confidence shaken, or my authority as an expert or a voice worth listening to questioned. I've also struggled with being the only one who will point out that something is sexist, or asking to write a rebuttal to a sexist news story like this Jimmy Iovine one and meeting resistance. Insidious sexism is still sexism. If it makes you question yourself and your perspective based on the fact that you're a woman, that's sexism!  
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    Hire women. 
    <p><strong><a href="http://www.rookiemag.com/" target="_blank">Erika Ramirez, Culture Editor of Rookie</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/3rika" target="_blank">@3rika</a></strong></p>
<div><strong>Where/how do you find new music?</strong></div>
<div>I discover new artists mostly on SoundCloud, YouTube, and social media (Twitter). I'm insatiable in a way where I can't get enough of new artists and music, but at the same time, when I discover and strongly believe in a new artist I champion them, such as Daniel Caesar, Raury, Tink, and even Sam Smith. I've also discovered the Discovery function (no-pun intended) on Spotify, which has recently put me onto new music.&nbsp;</div>
<div><strong style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.6;">What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Once I pronounced "intestine" wrong (I said it in Spanish) in my animal physiology class in high-school, I knew I had to figure out what I really wanted to do. Joking, not joking. I looked towards my passions: writing and music. I went with it. I wrote album reviews in college, worked at my local newspaper. I'd hold my ear close to my brother's bedroom wall and listen to what he'd be listening to (Rakim, Big Pun, Tribe Called Quest, Stevie Wonder). I wanted to talk about it, learn about it. I didn't know how I'd become a music writer, coming from a small town like Tracy, Calif. but I was blessed with an internship at VIBE in end of 2006. I said good-bye to GAP, and packed my bags. Fuck fear and regret.</div>
<div><strong style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.6;">Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?</strong></div>
<div>To this day, people question my knowledge of hip-hop, because I'm a woman. "Oh, you listen to rap?" "You don't look like you listen to rap." I can't help but laugh. I let my writing do the talking. I've known women that receive a lesser raise or pay rate than men. I heard through the grapevine that an editor passed on me writing a cover story (that I'd pitch months prior) because my byline wasn't "known." They assigned to a male writer...I forget his name, though.</div>
<div><strong style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.6;">If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>Women aren't "sitting around" "complaining" about boys. We're building our own empires. We're fighting sexism and ignorance, fighting for equal pay and respect. We're creating music, discovering artists who have the potential to be as big, if not bigger, than those he's signed or worked with, or writing about the music that we found ourselves. We're behind some of the biggest machines, holding shit down.</div>

    Photo via @ramirezerika

    Erika Ramirez, Culture Editor of Rookie@3rika

    Where/how do you find new music?
    I discover new artists mostly on SoundCloud, YouTube, and social media (Twitter). I'm insatiable in a way where I can't get enough of new artists and music, but at the same time, when I discover and strongly believe in a new artist I champion them, such as Daniel Caesar, Raury, Tink, and even Sam Smith. I've also discovered the Discovery function (no-pun intended) on Spotify, which has recently put me onto new music. 
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    Once I pronounced "intestine" wrong (I said it in Spanish) in my animal physiology class in high-school, I knew I had to figure out what I really wanted to do. Joking, not joking. I looked towards my passions: writing and music. I went with it. I wrote album reviews in college, worked at my local newspaper. I'd hold my ear close to my brother's bedroom wall and listen to what he'd be listening to (Rakim, Big Pun, Tribe Called Quest, Stevie Wonder). I wanted to talk about it, learn about it. I didn't know how I'd become a music writer, coming from a small town like Tracy, Calif. but I was blessed with an internship at VIBE in end of 2006. I said good-bye to GAP, and packed my bags. Fuck fear and regret.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?
    To this day, people question my knowledge of hip-hop, because I'm a woman. "Oh, you listen to rap?" "You don't look like you listen to rap." I can't help but laugh. I let my writing do the talking. I've known women that receive a lesser raise or pay rate than men. I heard through the grapevine that an editor passed on me writing a cover story (that I'd pitch months prior) because my byline wasn't "known." They assigned to a male writer...I forget his name, though.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    Women aren't "sitting around" "complaining" about boys. We're building our own empires. We're fighting sexism and ignorance, fighting for equal pay and respect. We're creating music, discovering artists who have the potential to be as big, if not bigger, than those he's signed or worked with, or writing about the music that we found ourselves. We're behind some of the biggest machines, holding shit down.
    <div><strong><a href="https://www.facebook.com/holychildmusic" target="_blank">Liz Nistico,&nbsp;Musician in&nbsp;Holychild</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/HOLYCHILD" target="_blank">@HOLYCHILD</a></strong></div>
<div><a href="https://www.facebook.com/holychildmusic">&nbsp;</a></div>
<div>
<div><strong>Where/how do&nbsp;you<em>&nbsp;</em>find new music?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I'm one of those people who are obsessed with music so I find it everywhere: blogs, the radio, magazines. I'm always checking out the opener at shows I go to, I'm always checking out music my favorite musicians are listening to. I'm always talking about music. It's pretty constant.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I can't not express myself and so I'm here and making music and I'm still in the industry because as much as I hate being judged, I hate having to be quiet about it. All of our music is social commentary about exactly what Jimmy is saying and there are too many people who agree with him. I'm still in the industry because things need to change.&nbsp;</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;</div>
<div>We used to be around more shady people when we first moved to L.A.&nbsp;who expected me to do coke with them in the bathroom and laugh at their jokes and flirt with them so I can move forward in my career. It made me really uncomfortable, but there are also men and women in the music industry who are not attracted to those archaic ideals and I am happy because those are the people I'm surrounded by now. It feels like every industry, 50% are stuck in the past (why is that?!).</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>I know Jimmy and I like him. I think he's generally good and means well, but we've evolved as a culture and thankfully gender is no longer so black and white. Guys are listening to Beyonc&eacute;, girls are into metal. People are more and more open with themselves and therefore the most lucrative move would be to further embrace that and present a world for listeners that is free of judgement. Gender ideals are judgement based and its paradoxical because music is such an escape for so many people.&nbsp;</div>
</div>

    Photo via @holychild

    Where/how do you find new music? 
    I'm one of those people who are obsessed with music so I find it everywhere: blogs, the radio, magazines. I'm always checking out the opener at shows I go to, I'm always checking out music my favorite musicians are listening to. I'm always talking about music. It's pretty constant.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I can't not express myself and so I'm here and making music and I'm still in the industry because as much as I hate being judged, I hate having to be quiet about it. All of our music is social commentary about exactly what Jimmy is saying and there are too many people who agree with him. I'm still in the industry because things need to change. 
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?  
    We used to be around more shady people when we first moved to L.A. who expected me to do coke with them in the bathroom and laugh at their jokes and flirt with them so I can move forward in my career. It made me really uncomfortable, but there are also men and women in the music industry who are not attracted to those archaic ideals and I am happy because those are the people I'm surrounded by now. It feels like every industry, 50% are stuck in the past (why is that?!).
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    I know Jimmy and I like him. I think he's generally good and means well, but we've evolved as a culture and thankfully gender is no longer so black and white. Guys are listening to Beyoncé, girls are into metal. People are more and more open with themselves and therefore the most lucrative move would be to further embrace that and present a world for listeners that is free of judgement. Gender ideals are judgement based and its paradoxical because music is such an escape for so many people. 
    <p><strong><a href="http://noisey.vice.com/en_us" target="_blank">Emma Garland, Staff Writer at NOISEY</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/emmaggarland" target="_blank">@emmaggarland</a></strong></p>
<div><strong>Where/how do you find new music?</strong></div>
<div>It's amazing&nbsp;that I even have time or strength&nbsp;to do this between all the hours I, as a woman, obviously&nbsp;spend sitting around talking about buff dudes&nbsp;and not knowing any DJs, but I find my&nbsp;music through: my&nbsp;friends, DIY shows, the internet,&nbsp;books, OTHER WOMEN, and&nbsp;generally doing my own goddamn research&nbsp;because,&nbsp;let's face it, unless you're content&nbsp;with the mainstream&nbsp;industry's&nbsp;spread of straight, earnest men in hats singing about cuddling&nbsp;then you&nbsp;have to do your own&nbsp;digging. &nbsp;&nbsp;</div>
<div><strong style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.6;">What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Same answer to both: music is my life force. &nbsp;</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?</strong></div>
<div>I always find this question difficult to answer because it's like "aside from the literal everyday struggle?" but....&nbsp;one time this&nbsp;guy&nbsp;hurled a load of sexist slurs at me&nbsp;and&nbsp;threatened to "come for my neck" over Twitter&nbsp;because of an&nbsp;article I wrote satirising a Christian vlogger's report that&nbsp;Rihanna's "BBHMM" video was an illuminati conspiracy. At the time it disturbed&nbsp;me so much I abandoned the freelance work I was doing for days and holed&nbsp;up in my flat. Then I told someone about it&nbsp;and burst out laughing at how fucking stupid it was that someone would get so sincerely vexed&nbsp;over a woman's&nbsp;satire of a vlogger's hot take of a pop video. &nbsp;</div>
<div><strong style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.6;">If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>A year ago, I probably would have written a detailed retort highlighting precisely&nbsp;why his patronising, sexist, heteronormative comments are so dumb I don't even know how he operates day to day, but I am so fucking sick of educating men.&nbsp;<strong>To paraphrase Meredith Graves,&nbsp;</strong>the&nbsp;onus has been on women for too long in this regard. Like, you&nbsp;made the mistake, now you put in&nbsp;the work to correct it. Teach yourself, dude. If you want to know why you fucked up, which you should,&nbsp;then read and listen to what women&nbsp;have to say, pay attention&nbsp;our voices,&nbsp;and acknowledge your privilege. Don't make us do more.</div>

    Photo via @emmaggarland

    Emma Garland, Staff Writer at NOISEY@emmaggarland

    Where/how do you find new music?
    It's amazing that I even have time or strength to do this between all the hours I, as a woman, obviously spend sitting around talking about buff dudes and not knowing any DJs, but I find my music through: my friends, DIY shows, the internet, books, OTHER WOMEN, and generally doing my own goddamn research because, let's face it, unless you're content with the mainstream industry's spread of straight, earnest men in hats singing about cuddling then you have to do your own digging.   
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    Same answer to both: music is my life force.  
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?
    I always find this question difficult to answer because it's like "aside from the literal everyday struggle?" but.... one time this guy hurled a load of sexist slurs at me and threatened to "come for my neck" over Twitter because of an article I wrote satirising a Christian vlogger's report that Rihanna's "BBHMM" video was an illuminati conspiracy. At the time it disturbed me so much I abandoned the freelance work I was doing for days and holed up in my flat. Then I told someone about it and burst out laughing at how fucking stupid it was that someone would get so sincerely vexed over a woman's satire of a vlogger's hot take of a pop video.  
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    A year ago, I probably would have written a detailed retort highlighting precisely why his patronising, sexist, heteronormative comments are so dumb I don't even know how he operates day to day, but I am so fucking sick of educating men. To paraphrase Meredith Graves, the onus has been on women for too long in this regard. Like, you made the mistake, now you put in the work to correct it. Teach yourself, dude. If you want to know why you fucked up, which you should, then read and listen to what women have to say, pay attention our voices, and acknowledge your privilege. Don't make us do more.
    <div><strong><strong><a href="http://thetalkhouse.com/" target="_blank">Brenna Ehrlich,&nbsp;Managing Editor of&nbsp;The Talkhouse,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/BrennaEhrlich" target="_blank">@BrennaEhrlich&nbsp;</a></strong></strong></div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div><strong>Where/how do&nbsp;you<em>&nbsp;</em>find new music?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>When I was a kid, I found music wherever I could get it: I fell in love with David Bowie when I was six after seeing "The Labyrinth." I discovered Nick Drake via that infamous Volkswagen commercial. I found out about XTC from an episode of "Gilmore Girls." (My hometown, sadly, didn't have much of a DIY scene when I was a kid.)</div>
<div>
<div>Luckily, my mom also had a HUGE record collection that she amassed over the years during her travels as an army brat, so I also had the Doors and Bob Dylan and the Moody Blues. What my mom didn't have, I bought at our local record store, Mystic Disc. I'm still pals with the guys who work there (hey, guys!).&nbsp;</div>
<div>Currently, I find music by going out to shows (opening bands are the best). I'm also the managing editor of a music site, so I get tons of press releases and albums daily. I ALSO have my own small label/press, All Ages Press, so I'm constantly looking for bands to book for my shows/put out on cassette.&nbsp;</div>
<div>When I'm feeling lazy? I kind of love Spotify Discover. I've always been a fan of grab bags.</div>
</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I've always been into music. I don't think I knew, when I was a kid, that I wanted to be the managing editor of a music site (I wanted to be a rock star or a paleontologist), but I'm a good writer/editor and I listen to a lot of music, so it makes sense that I ended up here.&nbsp;</div>
<div>
<div>Why am I still here? I suppose because this is what I'm good at -- and this is what I enjoy. If either/or ceased to be true, I'd find something else to pursue.&nbsp;</div>
<strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Oh, I've heard it all&mdash;commenters saying that I must have sucked a lot of dick to get my job (forget my Master's in journalism and seven-plus years of experience), glass ceiling issues, etc, etc.&nbsp;
<div>The worst example happened pretty recently and it was really the most upsetting. My boyfriend is a musician and at one of his shows two people in one evening called me a groupie. One person was in the industry. I think he THOUGHT he was joking. He said something along the lines of, "Well, you sleep with him and go to his shows, so..." I answered, "Well, my sex life is none of your business, but he comes to my book readings, so I assume you'd call him a groupie, too?"</div>
<div>The other culprit was some dude that was trying to hit on me at&nbsp;<span class="aBn" tabindex="0" data-term="goog_214017693"><span class="aQJ">2 a.m.</span></span>&nbsp;while I was waiting for everyone to finish packing up so we could go home. When I pointed to my boyfriend and told the guy that I was taken, he said something akin to, "There's a difference between a muse and a groupie..." I told him to fuck off, which I never do so blatantly.</div>
<div>I<strong>f you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
</div>
<div>Honestly, I have no idea. I would THINK that it's extremely obvious that comments such as those he made the other week are not OK (in the same way that it's obvious that drowning puppies is bad), but people keep putting their feet in their mouths, so... Just think about why you said what you said and how you can avoid saying something like that again. And it's not just about watching your mouth -- it's about watching your brain as well.</div>

    Photo via @brennaehrlich

     
    Where/how do you find new music? 
    When I was a kid, I found music wherever I could get it: I fell in love with David Bowie when I was six after seeing "The Labyrinth." I discovered Nick Drake via that infamous Volkswagen commercial. I found out about XTC from an episode of "Gilmore Girls." (My hometown, sadly, didn't have much of a DIY scene when I was a kid.)
    Luckily, my mom also had a HUGE record collection that she amassed over the years during her travels as an army brat, so I also had the Doors and Bob Dylan and the Moody Blues. What my mom didn't have, I bought at our local record store, Mystic Disc. I'm still pals with the guys who work there (hey, guys!). 
    Currently, I find music by going out to shows (opening bands are the best). I'm also the managing editor of a music site, so I get tons of press releases and albums daily. I ALSO have my own small label/press, All Ages Press, so I'm constantly looking for bands to book for my shows/put out on cassette. 
    When I'm feeling lazy? I kind of love Spotify Discover. I've always been a fan of grab bags.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I've always been into music. I don't think I knew, when I was a kid, that I wanted to be the managing editor of a music site (I wanted to be a rock star or a paleontologist), but I'm a good writer/editor and I listen to a lot of music, so it makes sense that I ended up here. 
    Why am I still here? I suppose because this is what I'm good at -- and this is what I enjoy. If either/or ceased to be true, I'd find something else to pursue. 
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry? 
    Oh, I've heard it all—commenters saying that I must have sucked a lot of dick to get my job (forget my Master's in journalism and seven-plus years of experience), glass ceiling issues, etc, etc. 
    The worst example happened pretty recently and it was really the most upsetting. My boyfriend is a musician and at one of his shows two people in one evening called me a groupie. One person was in the industry. I think he THOUGHT he was joking. He said something along the lines of, "Well, you sleep with him and go to his shows, so..." I answered, "Well, my sex life is none of your business, but he comes to my book readings, so I assume you'd call him a groupie, too?"
    The other culprit was some dude that was trying to hit on me at 2 a.m. while I was waiting for everyone to finish packing up so we could go home. When I pointed to my boyfriend and told the guy that I was taken, he said something akin to, "There's a difference between a muse and a groupie..." I told him to fuck off, which I never do so blatantly.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    Honestly, I have no idea. I would THINK that it's extremely obvious that comments such as those he made the other week are not OK (in the same way that it's obvious that drowning puppies is bad), but people keep putting their feet in their mouths, so... Just think about why you said what you said and how you can avoid saying something like that again. And it's not just about watching your mouth -- it's about watching your brain as well.
    <p><strong><a href="http://music.cbc.ca/" target="_blank">Melody Lau, Assistant Producer at CBC Music</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/melodylamb" target="_blank">@melodylamb</a></strong></p>
<div>
<div><strong>Where/how do&nbsp;you<em>&nbsp;</em>find new music?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I find out about new music everywhere! Going to shows, checking out new arrivals at record stores, reading blogs, my Twitter feed, what song my neighbour is loudly singing along to. (Last time, he was shouting Walk the Moon's "Shut Up And Dance"!) Looking for new music is fairly easy for people of all genders.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I wanted to work in the music industry because first and foremost, I'm a fan of music. My writing skills developed over time (I'm still working on it), but I've always found solace in music. I find joy in discovering, discussing and analyzing music and no one can diminish my passion but me. I can be discouraged really easily sometimes, but I surround myself with people I trust and look up to. Most of the time, that feeling of support comes from reading the work of and interacting with other female writers.</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;</div>
<div>One recurring problem I deal with all the time is the way men act towards me in interviews. This is often both a sexist and racist problem. I've been asked numerous times where I'm "from" and they are never satisfied when I say, "From here?" (Toronto, specifically) because what they always mean is, "Are you Chinese? Korean? Japanese? You look exotic." I guarantee you that's something women of colour deal with way more than anyone else and it's the worst. In another instance a man ignored many of questions, sat next to me in a booth without my permission (as opposed to across from me) and proceeded to tell my that my handwriting was pretty.</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>Women don't have trouble finding music. What women do struggle with are income inequality, sexual and reproductive rights and LGBT discrimination, just to name a few. So I implore you to focus on that, if you really want to help make things easier for women in some way.</div>
</div>

    Photo via @melodythelamb

    Melody Lau, Assistant Producer at CBC Music@melodylamb

    Where/how do you find new music? 
    I find out about new music everywhere! Going to shows, checking out new arrivals at record stores, reading blogs, my Twitter feed, what song my neighbour is loudly singing along to. (Last time, he was shouting Walk the Moon's "Shut Up And Dance"!) Looking for new music is fairly easy for people of all genders.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I wanted to work in the music industry because first and foremost, I'm a fan of music. My writing skills developed over time (I'm still working on it), but I've always found solace in music. I find joy in discovering, discussing and analyzing music and no one can diminish my passion but me. I can be discouraged really easily sometimes, but I surround myself with people I trust and look up to. Most of the time, that feeling of support comes from reading the work of and interacting with other female writers.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?  
    One recurring problem I deal with all the time is the way men act towards me in interviews. This is often both a sexist and racist problem. I've been asked numerous times where I'm "from" and they are never satisfied when I say, "From here?" (Toronto, specifically) because what they always mean is, "Are you Chinese? Korean? Japanese? You look exotic." I guarantee you that's something women of colour deal with way more than anyone else and it's the worst. In another instance a man ignored many of questions, sat next to me in a booth without my permission (as opposed to across from me) and proceeded to tell my that my handwriting was pretty.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    Women don't have trouble finding music. What women do struggle with are income inequality, sexual and reproductive rights and LGBT discrimination, just to name a few. So I implore you to focus on that, if you really want to help make things easier for women in some way.
    <div><strong><a href="http://brixtonagency.com/" target="_blank">Talia Miller, Co-owner of Brixton Agency</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/vivatalia" target="_blank">@vivatalia</a></strong></div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>
<div><strong>Where/how do&nbsp;you<em>&nbsp;</em>find new music?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Usually through music sites like NPR, Stereogum, Pitchfork and BrooklynVegan because I read these every day for my job.&nbsp; I also have a handful of friends who I trust for recommendations and I like Spotify's "Discover" playlist they curate for their users individually each week as well.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Music played a powerful role in my adolescent search for self and allowed me to find a community that embraced intelligent, forward-thinking, creative people and linked me with them across the globe. I remember discovering bands like Sleater-Kinney, Bikini Kill, Bratmobile and Fugazi that helped to shape my worldview, and the influential women I grew up around in the DC punk community who always made me feel at home. I'm still here because I hope that I can provide the same source of comfort and formidable presence that those role models held up for me.&nbsp; Without them, I would have had a much harder time finding my voice - I can't express how much they empowered me at a young age and how lucky I am to have had that. I've been working in music in some way since I was fourteen years old and I can't imagine doing anything else. It's provided me with a worldwide community, incredibly friendships and a strong sense of self.</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;</div>
<div>It's so rampant it's hard to pick just one! A general theme seems to be men questioning me and my work in a way that I don't see them interact with other men. It's shocking to me how frequently I still get asked if I can "handle" a client, a particular project, or situation by men in the industry.&nbsp; I never see men condescend to other men like that.&nbsp; I've also had situations in my work as a publicist with male writers/editors behaving inappropriately towards me which is always uncomfortable.</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>I'm disappointed in the sexism behind his statement but what is the hardest to swallow is his singling out of "girls".&nbsp; Because teenage girls have it hard enough, and they question themselves enough and as a girl and a music fan, you are constantly being asked to prove yourself above and beyond what any boy is - something that unfortunately continues into adulthood.&nbsp; Beyond that, to insinuate that boys are the most important, driving factor in a girl's life, that they are the reason girls turn to music is beyond ludicrous. It denies girls an identity and a voice beyond men and defines them by men, which goes beyond sexism to something much more sinister.</div>
</div>

    Photo via @vivatalia

     
    Where/how do you find new music? 
    Usually through music sites like NPR, Stereogum, Pitchfork and BrooklynVegan because I read these every day for my job.  I also have a handful of friends who I trust for recommendations and I like Spotify's "Discover" playlist they curate for their users individually each week as well.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    Music played a powerful role in my adolescent search for self and allowed me to find a community that embraced intelligent, forward-thinking, creative people and linked me with them across the globe. I remember discovering bands like Sleater-Kinney, Bikini Kill, Bratmobile and Fugazi that helped to shape my worldview, and the influential women I grew up around in the DC punk community who always made me feel at home. I'm still here because I hope that I can provide the same source of comfort and formidable presence that those role models held up for me.  Without them, I would have had a much harder time finding my voice - I can't express how much they empowered me at a young age and how lucky I am to have had that. I've been working in music in some way since I was fourteen years old and I can't imagine doing anything else. It's provided me with a worldwide community, incredibly friendships and a strong sense of self.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?  
    It's so rampant it's hard to pick just one! A general theme seems to be men questioning me and my work in a way that I don't see them interact with other men. It's shocking to me how frequently I still get asked if I can "handle" a client, a particular project, or situation by men in the industry.  I never see men condescend to other men like that.  I've also had situations in my work as a publicist with male writers/editors behaving inappropriately towards me which is always uncomfortable.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    I'm disappointed in the sexism behind his statement but what is the hardest to swallow is his singling out of "girls".  Because teenage girls have it hard enough, and they question themselves enough and as a girl and a music fan, you are constantly being asked to prove yourself above and beyond what any boy is - something that unfortunately continues into adulthood.  Beyond that, to insinuate that boys are the most important, driving factor in a girl's life, that they are the reason girls turn to music is beyond ludicrous. It denies girls an identity and a voice beyond men and defines them by men, which goes beyond sexism to something much more sinister.
    <div><strong><a href="http://www.mishikatsu.com/" target="_blank">Kate Ross,&nbsp;Co-founder/Owner of Mishi Katsu</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/rossbizmgmt/" target="_blank">Principal at Ross Business Management</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/kate_ross_" target="_blank">@<span class="u-linkComplex-target">kate_ross_</span></a></strong></div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>
<div><strong>Where/how do&nbsp;you<em>&nbsp;</em>find new music?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>First of all, I want to say that I have a Spotify account but don&rsquo;t use it.&nbsp; I don&rsquo;t use Pandora and I haven&rsquo;t even downloaded the Apple Music free trial. For the past few years, my sole means of connecting with music electronically have been Soundcloud and,&nbsp;occasionally,&nbsp;Youtube.&nbsp;I find new music through Soundcloud, attending shows, reading blogs and connecting with friends and colleagues.&nbsp; I love sharing music and I love when people share it with me.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I never thought that working in the music industry could be a reality for me.&nbsp; I grew up playing classical guitar, did some musical theater and started rapping in college. After college, however, I worked in finance.&nbsp;After a series of events, I found myself unemployed and looking for work, taking odd jobs here and there.&nbsp; Friends started asking me to come in and evaluate their companies&rsquo; finances and give advice. A client suggested that I start my own company. That was nearly four years ago and I have been running RBM ever since.&nbsp;I started managing artists about two years ago.&nbsp; I joined forces with my friend Paige Plissner (&nbsp;(a DJ and radio host) as I saw myself as more of a business expert and Paige as a tastemaker.</div>
<div>Why am I still here?&nbsp;In Victor Frankl&rsquo;s &ldquo;Man&rsquo;s Search for Meaning&rdquo; he writes about the difference between careers and vocations.&nbsp; Finance was my career:&nbsp;I was good at it;&nbsp;I made a lot of money but was unhappy. Helping artists is my vocation. It is a calling, a mission; it is like a sneeze, I can&rsquo;t avoid it.&nbsp; I can&rsquo;t imagine doing anything else at this point. Even when the days feel like they are never going to end and I don&rsquo;t think I can endure another bad experience, I get up the next day and I keep working.</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;</div>
<div>I had a lunch meeting with an A&amp;R guy from a major label at a festival this past summer. After lunch, we went outside to smoke a cigarette and he asked me to come back to his hotel room and do ecstasy. I dropped the &ldquo;G-bomb&rdquo;&ndash;the &ldquo;I have a girlfriend, a.k.a I&rsquo;m gay&rdquo; bomb&ndash;and he left and hasn&rsquo;t responded to any business-related emails since.&nbsp;I think gender is a touchy subject and honestly fear potential backlash from sharing my story. Before working in the music industry, I spent five years in finance. Although finance is very different than music, both industries are male-dominated, which can make it difficult to have meaningful conversations about gender.</div>
<div>Unfortunately, women who want to discuss their experiences as women are often accused of complaining.&nbsp;&nbsp;There&rsquo;s also an unspoken assumption that successful women either slept their way to the top or are complete bitches.&nbsp;&nbsp;While no one can accuse me of the former (being gay has given me some bizarre privilege in that sense), I&rsquo;ve still read books like, "Nice Girls Don&rsquo;t Get The Corner Office&rdquo; and &ldquo;How To Be The Boss Without Being A Bitch,&rdquo; regarding the latter.</div>
<div>I am extremely grateful to have worked with some amazing people who respect me as a person. That being said, I still watch what I wear and pick my battles. I am usually a little hesitant to give my thoughts on gender issues, but I try to stay honest and hold my personal values dearly.</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>I would probably ask him if he had a daughter and was that all he would expect out of her (to sit around complaining about boys).&nbsp;Then I would invite him to&nbsp;a Nap Girls events and show him how women actually choose music.</div>
</div>

    Photo va @kate_ross_

     
    Where/how do you find new music? 
    First of all, I want to say that I have a Spotify account but don’t use it.  I don’t use Pandora and I haven’t even downloaded the Apple Music free trial. For the past few years, my sole means of connecting with music electronically have been Soundcloud and, occasionally, Youtube. I find new music through Soundcloud, attending shows, reading blogs and connecting with friends and colleagues.  I love sharing music and I love when people share it with me.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I never thought that working in the music industry could be a reality for me.  I grew up playing classical guitar, did some musical theater and started rapping in college. After college, however, I worked in finance. After a series of events, I found myself unemployed and looking for work, taking odd jobs here and there.  Friends started asking me to come in and evaluate their companies’ finances and give advice. A client suggested that I start my own company. That was nearly four years ago and I have been running RBM ever since. I started managing artists about two years ago.  I joined forces with my friend Paige Plissner ( (a DJ and radio host) as I saw myself as more of a business expert and Paige as a tastemaker.
    Why am I still here? In Victor Frankl’s “Man’s Search for Meaning” he writes about the difference between careers and vocations.  Finance was my career: I was good at it; I made a lot of money but was unhappy. Helping artists is my vocation. It is a calling, a mission; it is like a sneeze, I can’t avoid it.  I can’t imagine doing anything else at this point. Even when the days feel like they are never going to end and I don’t think I can endure another bad experience, I get up the next day and I keep working.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?  
    I had a lunch meeting with an A&R guy from a major label at a festival this past summer. After lunch, we went outside to smoke a cigarette and he asked me to come back to his hotel room and do ecstasy. I dropped the “G-bomb”–the “I have a girlfriend, a.k.a I’m gay” bomb–and he left and hasn’t responded to any business-related emails since. I think gender is a touchy subject and honestly fear potential backlash from sharing my story. Before working in the music industry, I spent five years in finance. Although finance is very different than music, both industries are male-dominated, which can make it difficult to have meaningful conversations about gender.
    Unfortunately, women who want to discuss their experiences as women are often accused of complaining.  There’s also an unspoken assumption that successful women either slept their way to the top or are complete bitches.  While no one can accuse me of the former (being gay has given me some bizarre privilege in that sense), I’ve still read books like, "Nice Girls Don’t Get The Corner Office” and “How To Be The Boss Without Being A Bitch,” regarding the latter.
    I am extremely grateful to have worked with some amazing people who respect me as a person. That being said, I still watch what I wear and pick my battles. I am usually a little hesitant to give my thoughts on gender issues, but I try to stay honest and hold my personal values dearly.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    I would probably ask him if he had a daughter and was that all he would expect out of her (to sit around complaining about boys). Then I would invite him to a Nap Girls events and show him how women actually choose music.
    <div><a href="https://twitter.com/Abi_Getto" target="_blank"><strong>Abi Getto, former&nbsp;Label Manager at Three Six Zero Group, @<span class="u-linkComplex-target">Abi_Getto</span></strong></a></div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>
<div><strong>Where/how do&nbsp;you<em>&nbsp;</em>find new music?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>Pretty much my entire life is spent searching for new music. SoundCloud and the music blogs are always good indicators of what&rsquo;s growing quickly on the Internet, which the first indicator of a solid new artist or track. I also spend a lot of time listening to the radio&mdash;tastemaker stations like KCRW, BBC Radio 1 and Beats 1&mdash;Jason Bentley, Annie Mac, Pete Tong, Zane Lowe, they all do a really solid job of dictating that &ldquo;next big thing&rdquo;&mdash;what&rsquo;s going to stand out in terms of growing from that internet-level of recognition to the mainstream (or niche radio) world.</div>
<div>My favorite way to find new music though is through non-industry friends. I love hearing what tracks people are listening to and connecting with. Music discovery is all about genuine connection to music&mdash;whether it&rsquo;s about partying or heartbreak, when an artist can make the listener empathize with his or her message, that&rsquo;s how a track becomes effective. I love hearing the kind of music that people who have no personal connection to artists or producers are connecting with. To me, that&rsquo;s the most genuine way to determine good music.</div>
<div><strong>What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here?&nbsp;</strong></div>
<div>I&rsquo;ve always been passionate about discovering new artists, but Annie Mac really gets credit for giving me the courage to pursue the music industry. I grew up between the U.S. and UK so I would listen to her show on BBC Radio 1, and hearing a female tastemaker&mdash;someone so well respected by a largely male audience&mdash;made the music industry somehow feel more attainable. It&rsquo;s interesting, you never feel bound by your gender, until someone comes along and smashes that boundary. Before Annie, I honestly would have never thought that something I was so passionate about could become a career. &nbsp;</div>
<div>I&rsquo;ve stayed in the industry because my passion for music has never waivered. I love its ability to unite people, and I&rsquo;m constantly fascinated by how quickly the landscape grows and adapts. It&rsquo;s an anthropological study&mdash;music teaches me everyday about how people connect and what fuels their fire. The industry is constantly evolving, which keep me on my toes and challenged to grow with it.</div>
<div><strong>Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;</div>
<div>I&rsquo;ve experienced a lot of sexism within the industry, and sadly a lot of it is ingrained. I&rsquo;ve had people automatically devalue my opinion and search for a second opinion from a male counterpart. This doesn&rsquo;t just happen in entry or mid-level positions - I&rsquo;ve seen high-level executive women who are forced to communicate through male counterparts&mdash;even male assistants&mdash;because their opinions aren&rsquo;t deemed invalid. This kind of thing happens all the time, and it&rsquo;s a depressing but hugely important reminder of how much further women have to go to have our opinions valued.</div>
<div><strong>If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?</strong></div>
<div>It&rsquo;s funny, Jimmy Iovine&rsquo;s statements seem really counterintuitive to me. Women are constantly under scrutiny for our complex emotions, we&rsquo;re deemed as the listeners of the world, the ones who feel much more deeply&ndash;this over anything would actually makes us more effective music consumers if he&rsquo;s looking to connect with an audience. To instead turn women into shallow, one-dimensional thinkers, he insults our ability to make those emotional connections&mdash;the very thing that makes us good consumers.</div>
<div>While I don&rsquo;t believe his statements were malicious, Mr. Iovine should understand that women have fought so hard to be in control of our own decisions. We&rsquo;re constantly told what a male-dominated society thinks we&rsquo;re capable of and what it expects of us, rather than seeing the value of our opinions and our ability to adapt and overcome. We&rsquo;ve fought to be respected in a male-dominated workforce, in a world with male-dominated opinions&mdash;we&rsquo;ve fought to be the curators of our own tastes. That&rsquo;s why the backlash against his (seemingly harmless) statement has been so strong&mdash;we&rsquo;re finally seeing progress and recognition of our abilities to be tastemakers, and that&rsquo;s an amazing result that shouldn&rsquo;t be overlooked.&nbsp;</div>
</div>

    Photo via @Abi_Getto

     
    Where/how do you find new music? 
    Pretty much my entire life is spent searching for new music. SoundCloud and the music blogs are always good indicators of what’s growing quickly on the Internet, which the first indicator of a solid new artist or track. I also spend a lot of time listening to the radio—tastemaker stations like KCRW, BBC Radio 1 and Beats 1—Jason Bentley, Annie Mac, Pete Tong, Zane Lowe, they all do a really solid job of dictating that “next big thing”—what’s going to stand out in terms of growing from that internet-level of recognition to the mainstream (or niche radio) world.
    My favorite way to find new music though is through non-industry friends. I love hearing what tracks people are listening to and connecting with. Music discovery is all about genuine connection to music—whether it’s about partying or heartbreak, when an artist can make the listener empathize with his or her message, that’s how a track becomes effective. I love hearing the kind of music that people who have no personal connection to artists or producers are connecting with. To me, that’s the most genuine way to determine good music.
    What made you want to work in the music industry and why are you still here? 
    I’ve always been passionate about discovering new artists, but Annie Mac really gets credit for giving me the courage to pursue the music industry. I grew up between the U.S. and UK so I would listen to her show on BBC Radio 1, and hearing a female tastemaker—someone so well respected by a largely male audience—made the music industry somehow feel more attainable. It’s interesting, you never feel bound by your gender, until someone comes along and smashes that boundary. Before Annie, I honestly would have never thought that something I was so passionate about could become a career.  
    I’ve stayed in the industry because my passion for music has never waivered. I love its ability to unite people, and I’m constantly fascinated by how quickly the landscape grows and adapts. It’s an anthropological study—music teaches me everyday about how people connect and what fuels their fire. The industry is constantly evolving, which keep me on my toes and challenged to grow with it.
    Can you share an example of sexism that you've experienced in the industry?  
    I’ve experienced a lot of sexism within the industry, and sadly a lot of it is ingrained. I’ve had people automatically devalue my opinion and search for a second opinion from a male counterpart. This doesn’t just happen in entry or mid-level positions - I’ve seen high-level executive women who are forced to communicate through male counterparts—even male assistants—because their opinions aren’t deemed invalid. This kind of thing happens all the time, and it’s a depressing but hugely important reminder of how much further women have to go to have our opinions valued.
    If you could say anything to Jimmy Iovine right now, what would it be?
    It’s funny, Jimmy Iovine’s statements seem really counterintuitive to me. Women are constantly under scrutiny for our complex emotions, we’re deemed as the listeners of the world, the ones who feel much more deeply–this over anything would actually makes us more effective music consumers if he’s looking to connect with an audience. To instead turn women into shallow, one-dimensional thinkers, he insults our ability to make those emotional connections—the very thing that makes us good consumers.
    While I don’t believe his statements were malicious, Mr. Iovine should understand that women have fought so hard to be in control of our own decisions. We’re constantly told what a male-dominated society thinks we’re capable of and what it expects of us, rather than seeing the value of our opinions and our ability to adapt and overcome. We’ve fought to be respected in a male-dominated workforce, in a world with male-dominated opinions—we’ve fought to be the curators of our own tastes. That’s why the backlash against his (seemingly harmless) statement has been so strong—we’re finally seeing progress and recognition of our abilities to be tastemakers, and that’s an amazing result that shouldn’t be overlooked. 
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