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private icon: grace slick

turn on, tune in, and drop out with a look straight from the haight ashbury superstar.

by: rebecca willa davis

November 27 2012

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The presidential election has finally come to an end, but we're still feeling the residual patriotic-ness and our annual America issue is on stands right now. Which is why each Private Icon this month hails from an iconic, American neighborhood that was pivotal in the development in our country's music history. So get ready for a few really good flashbacks and prepare to pay your respects to some women you should channel every morning when you zip up your skinny jeans. "It's a new dawn," was how Grace Slick greeted the crowd at Woodstock in 1969--and she wasn't kidding. Since moving to San Francisco in 1965, Slick was an integral part of the turn-on, tune-in, drop-out crowd that populated the city's Haight-Ashbury neighborhood, first with the band The Great Society and then with Jefferson Airplane. The district was filled with the groovy rebels who have now come to represent the free love ethos, from Janis Joplin (that's her chilling with Slick in the image above--coolest duo ever, right?) to the Grateful Dead, culminating in 1968's Summer of Love. But though Slick, whose songs "Somebody to Love" and "White Rabbit" came to define a generation and elevated Jefferson Airplane to rock star status, may have espoused a hippie philosophy her look was anything but crunchy. From paisley maxi-dresses to fringed tunics, wild curly tresses to carefully straightened bangs, Slick embodied the free spirited babe of the era. Eventually, the psychedelic San Francisco rock of the '60s gave way to New York punk of the '70s--and Jefferson Airplane morphed into arena rock super-band Jefferson Starship. But one thing that hasn't changed is Slick's girl crush-worthy look. Go ask Alice, indeed.
PRIVATE ICON GRACE SLICK
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